Fire Prevention Safety Tips

We added graphics below that educate the community about the different sounds smoke and carbon monoxide alarms make, and knowing what to do when an alarm sounds. 

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Fire Prevention

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Sample message:

"(NAME OF YOUR FIRE DEPARTMENT) wants to share safety tips to help you “Learn the Sounds of Fire Safety”

-A continuous set of three loud beeps—beep, beep, beep—means smoke or fire. Get out, call 9-1-1, and stay out.
-A single chirp every 30 or 60 seconds means the battery is low and must be changed.
-Chirping that continues after the battery has been replaced means the alarm is at the end of its life and the unit must be replaced.
-All smoke alarms must be replaced after 10 years.
-Make sure your smoke and carbon monoxide alarms meet the needs of all your family members, including those with sensory or physical disabilities.

Source: National Fire Protection Association


Hear a chirp, make a change!

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Sample message:

It’s important to learn the different sounds of smoke and carbon monoxide alarms. A single chirp every 30 or 60 seconds means the battery is low and must be changed. Chirping that continues after changing the battery means the alarm is at the end of its life and the unit must be replaced.

Source: National Fire Protection Association


Hear a beep, get on your feet!

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Sample message:

"A continuous set of loud beeps—beep, beep, beep—means smoke or carbon monoxide is present in your home. Get out and stay out! Call 9-1-1 from outside.

For the best protection, use combination smoke and carbon monoxide alarms that are interconnected throughout the home. These can be installed by a qualified electrician, so that when one sounds, they all sound. This ensures you can hear the alarm no matter where in your home the alarm originates."

Source: National Fire Protection Association


Replace Your Smoke Alarms Every 10 Years

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Sample message:
"Replace all smoke alarms when they are 10 years old. If you don’t know how old the alarm is, replace it!"

Source: National Fire Protection Association 


Test Your Smoke Alarms

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Sample message:
"Test your alarms at least once a month, and make sure your alarms meet the needs of all your family members, including those with sensory or physical disabilities.

There are smoke alarms and alert devices that alert people who are deaf or hard of hearing. These devices include strobe lights that flash to alert people when the smoke alarm sounds. Pillow or bed shakers designed to work with your smoke alarm also can be purchased and installed."

Source: National Fire Protection Association


How to Learn the Sounds of Your Specific Alarms

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Sample message:
"Make sure everyone in your home understands the sounds of the smoke and carbon monoxide alarms and knows how to respond. To learn the sounds of your specific alarms, check the manufacturer’s instructions that came in the box, or search the brand and model online."

Source: National Fire Protection Association


Check the Batteries and the Alarm's Expiration Date

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Sample message:
"
Hear a chirp, make a change! A single chirp every 30 or 60 seconds means the battery is low and must be changed. Replace the batteries or the entire alarm if it is older than 10 years old. If you don’t remember how old it is, replace it."

Source: National Fire Protection Association 


Learn the Sounds of Fire Safety

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Download

Sample message:

"It’s important to learn the different sounds of alarms. When a smoke or carbon monoxide alarm makes noise—a beeping sound or a chirping sound—you must take action!

Hear a Beep, Get on Your Feet! A continuous set of loud beeps means smoke, fire, or carbon monoxide. Get out, call 9-1-1, and stay out!

Hear a Chirp, Make a Change! A single chirp every 30 or 60 seconds means the battery is low and must be changed. Chirping that continues after changing the battery means the alarm is at the end of its life and it must be replaced.

Source: National Fire Protection Association 


 

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