Flood and Storm Safety Tips

Flooding is a leading cause of death in many disasters. We have added shareable graphics on how to prepare for a flood and stay safe during a floods that you can posts to your residents on Neighbors.

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Storm Surge Warning vs. Storm Surge Watch

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Sample message: 
 Do you know the difference between a Storm Surge Warning and a Storm Surge Watch? A Storm Surge Warning means there is a danger of life-threatening flooding within the next 36 hours. A Storm Surge Watch means there is a possibility of life-threatening flooding within the next 48 hours. In either case, please promptly follow evacuation and other instructions from local officials. Visit weather.gov/hurricanesafety for more hurricane safety tips.

Source: National Weather Service) 


Be Flood Smart: Flood Safety Tips

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More than 50% of all flood fatalities are vehicle-related. You never know how deep the water is or if the road has been washed away or compromised beneath the water. It only takes 12 inches of water to carry off a small car and 18 inches of water to sweep a larger vehicle away Don’t risk driving into floodwaters!

(Source: National Weather Service)


The Power of Water

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Sample message: 
More than 50% of all flood fatalities are vehicle-related. You never know how deep the water is or if the road has been washed away or compromised beneath the water. It only takes 12 inches of water to carry off a small car and 18 inches of water to sweep a larger vehicle away Don’t risk driving into floodwaters!

(Source: National Weather Service)


Flood Warning vs. Flood Watch

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Sample message: 
Do you know the difference between a Flood Watch and a Flood Warning? A warning means “Take Action Now!” because flooding is imminent or already occurring. If advised to evacuate, do so immediately. A watch means “Be Prepared” because flooding is possible within your area.

(Source: National Weather Service)


Weathering the Storm

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Sample message: 
“ Debris flows often happen in areas where excessive rain causes soil to become so saturated it turns into very runny mud. The mud then races downhill, picking up debris such as fallen branches, tree trunks, and rocks as it goes. Debris flows can bury homes under piles of mud and debris. Know the risks of the area where you live, so you can prepare your family and home before heavy rains threaten your area. weather.gov/safety/flood-hazards  (

Source: National Weather Service)


Battling the Breeze

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Sample message: 
Damaging winds are labelled as those greater than 50-60 mph. Although rotating winds within a tornado draw a lot of attention, straight-line winds are significantly more widespread. At different wind speeds, high straight-line winds can cause isolated to wide-spread damage, turning everyday objects into projectiles and posing a significant threat to your safety.

To minimize the risk to your family and your community, please ensure you take safety measures such as:

- Securing any loose items (e.g. loose gutters, shutters, patio furniture, anything outside that can blow away or fly through a window)

- Charge batteries of all essential items (cell phones, power banks, weather radios, power tools)

- Check your emergency kit to ensure it includes 3 days of food and water for each person in your home

To learn more, please visit https://www.weather.gov/safety/wind 
(Source: National Weather Service)


High Wind Safety Tips

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The safest place to be during high wind is indoors. However, if you are caught outside follow these safety tips to keep you and your loved ones safe.

-Take cover next to a building or under a shelter.
-Stand clear of roadways or train tracks, as a gust may blow you into the path of an oncoming vehicle.
-Use handrails where available on outdoor walkways and avoid other elevated areas such as roofs without adequate railing.
-Watch for flying debris. Tree limbs may break and street signs may become loose during strong wind gusts. -Keep an eye toward nearby balconies for loose objects that may fall.

If you are caught driving follow these tips:

-Keep both hands on the wheel and slow down.
-Watch for objects blowing across the roadway and into your path.
-Keep a safe distance from cars in adjacent lanes as strong gusts could push a car outside its lane of travel.
-Take extra care in a high-profile vehicle such as a truck, van, SUV, or when towing a trailer, as these are more prone to be pushed or even flipped by high wind gusts.
-If winds are severe enough to prevent safe driving, get onto the shoulder of the road and stop, making sure you are away from trees or other tall objects that could fall onto your vehicle. Stay in the car and turn on the hazard lights until the wind subsides.
(Source: National Weather Service)


 

 

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