Heating Fire Safety (U.S. Fire Administration)

Remind residents about space heater/fireplace heating safety and the use of carbon monoxide alarms with the verified sample messaging from the U.S. Fire Administration. You can download and post these to your residents on Neighbors.

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Heat your Home Safely this Winter

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Sample message:

Follow these heating safety tips:
-Keep anything that can burn, such as bedding, clothing and curtains, at least 3 feet away from a heater.
-Ensure the heater has an automatic shut-off, so if it tips over, it shuts off.
-Turn heaters off when you go to bed or leave the room.
-Plug portable heaters directly into outlets and never into an extension cord or power strip.
-Only use portable heaters from a recognized testing laboratory.

Source: U.S Fire Administration


Chimney Safety Tips

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Sample message:

Follow these tips to ensure your fireplace is safe to use:

-Have a professional inspect and clean your fireplace and chimney each year before you begin using it for the season.
-If you’re using a gas or wood fireplace, open the chimney flue before starting the fire to let fresh air feed the flames and allow smoke to exit
-Close the flue once the fire is put out
-It’s also important to keep the area surrounding the fireplace free from flammable objects
-Be extra cautious of this during the holidays. Keep decorations and stockings a safe distance away from fire and never use your fireplace to burn Christmas trees or wrapping paper. Pine boughs and paper burn intensely and can lead to a roof or chimney fire.

Source: U.S Fire Administration


Do you own a Fire place?

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Sample message:

Keep these tips in mind when using a fireplace:
-Keep a glass or metal screen in front of the fireplace to prevent embers or sparks jumping out.
-Don’t burn paper in your fireplace.
-Put the fire out before you go to sleep or leave your home.
-Put ashes in a metal container with a lid, outside, at least 10 feet from your home.

Source: U.S Fire Administration


Don't heat your Home with your Oven!

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Sample message:

[Community Name] residents,

Ovens and stoves are not designed to heat your home. Using your oven or stove for heat not only creates a fire danger, but also if you have a gas stove, it can create a carbon monoxide danger.

Source: U.S Fire Administration


Test Your Carbon Monoxide Alarm

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Sample message:

[Community Name] residents,

You should be testing your CO alarms once a month! CO is odorless, colorless, and otherwise undetectable to the human senses, people may not know that they are being exposed. The initial symptoms of low to moderate CO poisoning are similar to the flu (but without the fever). They include:
-Headache
-Fatigue
-Shortness of breath
-Nausea
-Dizziness

High level CO poisoning results in progressively more severe symptoms, including:
-Mental confusion
-Vomiting
-Loss of muscular coordination
-Loss of consciousness
-Death

Source: U.S Fire Administration


Space Heater Purchasing Tips

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Sample message:

Two in five deaths in space heater fires involve portable electric space heaters.

When the weather turns cold, it can bring a chill into our homes. Portable space heaters have become a popular way to supplement central heating or heat one room. If you plan to use portable electric space heaters, make sure to follow these tips and recommendations:

-Purchase a heater with the seal of a qualified testing laboratory.
-Make sure your heater has an auto shut-off to turn the heater off if it tips over.
-Keep the heater at least 3 feet away from anything that can burn, including people.
-Plug the heater directly into the wall outlet. Never use an extension cord.
-Space heaters should be turned off and unplugged when you leave the room or go to bed.

Source: U.S Fire Administration


Fuel Burning Heating Tips

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Sample message:

Keep kerosene, or other flammable liquids stored in approved metal containers, in well-ventilated storage areas, outside of the house.
Never fill the heater while it’s operating or hot. When refueling an oil or kerosene unit, avoid overfilling.
Refueling should be done outside of the home or outdoors

Source: U.S Fire Administration


 

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